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 Post subject: GIFT Tilapia
PostPosted: Jan 22nd, '21, 03:27 
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Joined: Jan 22nd, '21, 03:11
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Location: Málaga, Spain
Still learning here, but wanted to do some research.. I'm located in Spain, ideally I would like to find GIFT tilapia (I think) for a system I'm planning... Though it's not set in stone and would be interested in seeing other options for fish in the area. Also if anyone has experience with GIFT Tilapia and what they can tell me :) Another thing is, if anyone has any experience with aquaponics in Spain or somewhere with a similar climate, talk to me, as I would be interested in getting some insight. T. I. A


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 Post subject: Re: GIFT Tilapia
PostPosted: Jan 24th, '21, 01:22 
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 Post subject: Re: GIFT Tilapia
PostPosted: Jan 26th, '21, 10:43 
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Hello!
I looked up the temps of Malaga, and it seems like they are pretty similar to here in Los Angeles, California, except that we get a little higher summer temps.

I have met a few people who have used tilapia. One gentleman I met used jacuzzis as ponds since they are already insulated, and grew them more as a RAS setup, with very little R (Recirculation) Though he did do frequent water changes, and used water hyacinth to remove nitrates. He used very little heating, though he did say that he used a 300 watt heater on very cold nights, less than 5 times a year, usually. And, he covered the tops with 2 inch styrofoam. He had kept them going this way for over 5 years, and they would reproduce. He said that he had Blue and, I believe Red Nile.

I had never heard of GIFT tilapia, so I looked it up. It looks like they selected traits from Nile Tilapia, which are said to have faster growth than other types anyways. I have read that Nile Tilapia typically have lower cold tolerance, if that matters. My experience with tilapia is limited, but I have caught (or my daughter did, but I unhooked it, LOL) a local tilapia that had characteristics like a Nile tilapia, so they might be able to survive colder temps than reported.

There are other fish farms/ hatcheries that focus on selective breeding for stronger growth rates and uniformity, so maybe you can find something like that if you aren't able to find the GIFT strain. We have one here in the state of Tennessee that comes to mind. I don't know if you can import from the US, or if it would be cost effective to do so. Also, if the fish farm practices grading, you might be able to get bigger/ stronger/faster growing fish.

Going local would probably be better in the long run. What kind of fish are in the rivers/ lakes/ creeks around your area?

Have you located any fish farms for aquaculture?

Tilapia seem to be most susceptible to other issues/ diseases/ fungus/ during cold weather, but I think that this is true for many fish. I have had the same issue with Sunfish in the winter here.

We actually have some wild tilapia populations here, though they are limited to certain bodies of water that have the conditions they thrive in (Water temps don't get too low).

Climate wise, my systems here do nicely outdoors, though I have taken a few measures to try to stabilize the temps and prevent too much fluctuation. (Insulation, sumps in the ground) It seems to work reasonably well, because the temps never jump drastically, warming of the water in the spring is rather gradual. I'm experimenting with overwintering some things, like peppers. I had a few habanero plants that did amazing in production in the summer/fall, and the leaves yellowed very badly over winter, and never grew well after that. I think the water stayed cool for too long. The water never seems to get much higher than 70 F or a little more. Which seems to slow heat loving plants down for me a little.

We sometimes see big swings between daytime highs and nighttime lows. About a week ago we hit around 90 F in the day, then dropped to 59-60F over night. And we had a few other days that were close to that. It seems to mess with the plants a bit.

I would have liked to get more seedlings started earlier in the fall. I think getting some things in a few months ago would have been good for the water. But, of course, things have been hard to get done these days. In general, I have been able to grow quite a bit over the winter here in outdoor AP. I would think you could as well. Cool weather stuff grows well here into the spring, and it seems like hot weather crops take a little longer to establish, but they also seem to produce longer than in the ground or in pots (still picking some peppers right now!) I overwintered a tomato plant twice now, and it has been flowering, and set some fruit in the heat wave, we'll see how it does. So once things are established, they seem to hang on longer.

I don't know if any of this will help, but I figured I'd chime in anyways......

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